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Showing posts from September, 2013

GUEST POST: Austism Conference, Part 4

Conference: Teaching Music to Students on the Autism Spectrum – May 9 and 10, 2014 The Boston Conservatory Program for Students on the Autism Spectrum will present its second annual two-day conference on Teaching Music to Students on the Autism Spectrum on Friday afternoon, May 9 and all day Saturday, May 10, 2014. The conference will take place at our Theater building at 31 Hemenway Street, in room 401. For information about the conference, please see http://www.bostonconservatory.edu/teaching-music-students-autism-spectrum. This year’s conference will feature a keynote address by Dr. Stephen Shore, renowned expert on autism, music, and education. Dr. Shore is a musician and educator on the autism spectrum who currently teaches at Adelphi University. He is author of Beyond the Wall: Personal Experiences with Autism and Aspberger Syndrome. He presents lectures and workshops to audiences around the world. We are delighted that Dr. Shore is a long-term supporter of The Boston …

GUEST POST: Oklahoma! Autism Part 3

Autism-Friendly Performance of “Oklahoma” at The Boston Conservatory – October 20 at 2 p.m. I am delighted to share this wonderful news with all of you: The Boston Conservatory will present an Autism-Friendly performance of the musical “Oklahoma” on Sunday, October 20 at 2 p.m. in the Boston Conservatory Theater at 31 Hemenway Street, Boston, MA 02115.
For information about the performance, please visit: http://www.bostonconservatory.edu/oklahoma-autism. The website includes a video to help prepare individuals on the autism spectrum for the performance, as well as a social story, a plot synopsis, and a character guide. It also explains the ways that the performance and the environment will be altered in order to make the entire experience Autism-Friendly.
This very special event is sponsored by The Boston Conservatory in conjunction with its Program for Students on the Autism Spectrum. For more information on that program, please visit: www.bostonconservatory.edu/autism.
We…

GUEST POST: Music Lessons for Autistic Spectrum Students: Part 2

In Boston
Music Lessons for Students on the Autism Spectrum In The Boston Conservatory Program for Students on the Autism Spectrum (www.bostonconservatory.edu/autism), we have been providing private musical instrument lessons to children and adults (age 9 and up) on the autism spectrum for five years. Our young students have studied piano, voice, violin, string bass, trumpet, guitar, and electric bass with trained graduate students in Music Education here at the Conservatory. Thanks to a team of consultants and trainers, the graduate students receive ongoing support and a great deal of training to work with these individuals. Over the last five years, we have had 15-25 students in the program in a given year. Enrollment has been between 22 and 25 students for the last few years.
The lessons take place on Saturday mornings here in Boston. The first semester of lessons begins on the first Saturday in October and runs until early December. We start up in early February for our…

GUEST POST: Autism Refresher Part 1

Students on the Autism Spectrum in your Classroom As the new school year gets underway, a quick refresher on autism spectrum disorder will help us better serve this growing population. First, a few facts about autism: ·The latest estimates are that autism affects one in 88 children.
·The term Autism describes a “spectrum” of issues characterized by difficulties or differences with communication and social understanding, as well as repetitive behaviors or intense interests.
·Autism can look very differently from person to person. Autism Speaks has a saying –
“If you’ve met one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism.”
It can be difficult to develop teaching strategies for individuals with autism because no one approach or method works with all individuals on the autism spectrum. Teachers should pay attention to students’ strengths and use them to help students succeed, as well as to fill in gaps in their knowledge. For example, an autistic child with a very s…