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Showing posts from May, 2013

End of Year classes

Step 1: Students choose 2 favorites from each list and vote.



Ahhhhh, it's June! Time to sit back and take it easy. If you've done your job, the students should be able to design their own lessons for the rest of the year.
YOU'RE DONE WITH LESSON PLANS FOR THE YEAR!
NO MORE PERSONAL TIME TO PLAN YOUR WEEK
NO MORE DREADING THAT PROBLEM CLASS
END THE YEAR WITH A JOYFUL SPIRIT Here's how it's done!

Kindergarten
Supplies: pencil or pen, clipboard, paper, props for games

Step 1: Ask the class, "What are your favorite songs and music games of the year?" 
Step 2: List them! 
Step 3: Make sure every child contributes at least one song to the list.
Step 4: Make a check next to multiple requests of the same song.
Step 5: Do these songs for the rest of the year. If you've taught them well, each class should have about 20-30 on the list. Schedule songs with multiple requests for the beginning and ending of lessons. You could also just put the names in a hat and have chi…

Solmization

When a piece modulates from one key to another there needs to be a change in "solmization."  If the key is a major one, the change is in the placement of "do."  All the other notes of the scale change as well.  If the change is very temporary you might not want to change the solmization.  That is where the art of the teacher comes in.  The music director/conductor/teacher determines the solmization of a piece. 

For good solmization, you need to know your solfa.  Click this previous post for that definition. 

On a practical note, I have never needed to fret about solmization in my teaching.  This is a problem with advanced children's choruses and Kodaly level class work.  If you struggle with solmization, don't sweat it!

Costa Rica: Hiring and Excellence

Hi. I'm fascinated with your post. I'm planning to start a Orff Ensemble into the School of Music where I'm the principal and the Conductor of the Youth Symphony Orchestra, in Grecia, Costa Rica. I very impressed with your vision of the work, and sincerely that is what I'm thinking about. Can you give some advice to start effectively a high-standard group of children, starting at 5 years old, in order to turn it in the base or 'seedbed' for our symphony program.
This reader's dilemma addresses the core value that is the heart and soul of Kodaly music education. Having studied at the highest levels in Juilliard, The Curtis Institute, and elsewhere, taught college level, Pre-school, I can safely say that the same general concepts are addressed throughout life.  From cradle to grave, we tackle speak/sing, high/low, loud/soft, short/long, smooth/bumpy, and short/long.

Whether in Costa Rica or San Francisco, you need a teacher with the right stuff.  Here's wha…

Halleluljah!

This song is so beautiful.  It was used in several tribute films of Boston Bombing victims.  It has been used for other tragedies.  It will be used in the future.  I taught my students in Grades 1-8 this song.  We sang it as a school for Grandparents' Day last week.  It was a tremendous success.  I figured out chords.  Please enjoy!
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Halleluljah by Leonard Cohen Please note: Lyrics in red are not suitable for school use.  They are, however, beautiful.  Please enjoy them at home.  
Capo on 2nd Fret


 G                               e minor
I've heard there was a secret chord
G                                     e minor
That David played, and it pleased the Lord
C                             G                     D7       G
But you don't really care for music, do you?

G
It goes like this
C                     D
The fourth, the fifth
e minor                 C
The minor fall, the major lift
G                       b minor     e minor
The baffle…

Violets